Privacy Policy

This privacy policy discloses the privacy practices for www.XXXXXXXX.com. This privacy policy applies solely to information collected by this web site. It will notify you of the following:

  1. What personally identifiable information is collected from you through the web site, how it is used and with whom it may be shared.
  2. What choices are available to you regarding the use of your data.
  3. The security procedures in place to protect the misuse of your information.
  4. How you can correct any inaccuracies in the information.

Information Collection, Use, and Sharing
We are the sole owners of the information collected on this site. We only have access to/collect information that you voluntarily give us via email or other direct contact from you. We will not sell or rent this information to anyone.

We will use your information to respond to you, regarding the reason you contacted us. We will not share your information with any third party outside of our organization, other than as necessary to fulfill your request, e.g. to ship an order.

Unless you ask us not to, we may contact you via email in the future to tell you about specials, new products or services, or changes to this privacy policy.

Your Access to and Control Over Information
You may opt out of any future contacts from us at any time. You can do the following at any time by contacting us via the email address or phone number given on our website:

  • See what data we have about you, if any.
  • Change/correct any data we have about you.
  • Have us delete any data we have about you.
  • Express any concern you have about our use of your data.

Security
We take precautions to protect your information. When you submit sensitive information via the website, your information is protected both online and offline.

Wherever we collect sensitive information (such as credit card data), that information is encrypted and transmitted to us in a secure way. You can verify this by looking for a closed lock icon at the bottom of your web browser, or looking for "https" at the beginning of the address of the web page.

While we use encryption to protect sensitive information transmitted online, we also protect your information offline. Only employees who need the information to perform a specific job (for example, billing or customer service) are granted access to personally identifiable information. The computers/servers in which we store personally identifiable information are kept in a secure environment.

Updates

Our Privacy Policy may change from time to time and all updates will be posted on this page.

If you feel that we are not abiding by this privacy policy, you should contact us immediately via telephone at 931-729-2686 or via email.

 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination against its customers, employees, and applicants for employment on the bases of race, color, national origin, age, disability, sex, gender identity, religion, reprisal, and where applicable, political beliefs, marital status, familial or parental status, sexual orientation, or all or part of an individual's income is derived from any public assistance program, or protected genetic information in employment or in any program or activity conducted or funded by the Department. (Not all prohibited bases will apply to all programs and/or employment activities.)

xxxxxxxxxxxxx County Soil Conservation District is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer.

FAQ

What is Soil Health?

The continued capacity of soil to function as a vital living ecosystem that sustains and improves the living condition of plants, animals and humans.

Can I pull gravel out of my creek?

You may be able to pull gravel from a creek, but only within guidelines of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). For more guidance call the TDEC office in Columbia at 931-490-3941 or visit their website: www.tennessee.gov/environment/permits/arapgps

In what situations do I need a permit?

Most work on streams, stream banks, waterways, or drainage areas should be reviewed by TDEC. If you have questions concerning permits you should contact the TDEC office in Columbia at 931-490-3941, or visit their website: www.tennessee.gov/environment/permits/arapgps

Who do I call for a burn permit?

The agency to call for a burn permit is the Tennessee Department of Agriculture “Division of Forestry”, their number is 1-877-350-(BURN) 2876 or online: www.BurnSafeTN.org. Burn permits are required from October 15 thru May 15 and at other times during certain weather conditions.

Where do I find soils information and aerial imagery for my farm?

The USDA-NRCS website provides aerial photography & soils information. http://websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov.

Where can I find floodplain maps for my property?

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has a great deal of flood information on their website. We have the ability in our office to generate maps for landowners with aerial imagery that has a flood plain map overlaid. Contact us to get a map of your property.

Who do I call when trying to locate underground utility lines (gas, phone, cable, electric, etc.)?

Before you DIG call “Tennessee One Call” at 811 or go to their website: www.tnonecall.com. A person can be held liable for damages incurred if they dig and do not call Tennessee One Call.

Other Questions?

Please call our office at xxx-xxx-xxxx x3

end faq

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination against its customers, employees, and applicants for employment on the bases of race, color, national origin, age, disability, sex, gender identity, religion, reprisal, and where applicable, political beliefs, marital status, familial or parental status, sexual orientation, or all or part of an individual's income is derived from any public assistance program, or protected genetic information in employment or in any program or activity conducted or funded by the Department. (Not all prohibited bases will apply to all programs and/or employment activities.)

 

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Today, Nonpoint Source Pollution (NPS) is the nation's largest source of water quality problems. It is the main reason that about 40 percent of our surveyed rivers, lakes, and estuaries are not clean enough to meet basic uses such as fishing or swimming. NPS pollution occurs when water runs over land or through the ground, picking up pollutants, and depositing them into rivers, lakes, and coastal waters or introducing them into ground water. NPS pollution is widespread because it can occur any time activities disturb the land or water. Agriculture, forestry, grazing, septic systems, recreational boating, urban runoff, construction, physical changes to stream channels, and habitat degradation are potential sources of NPS pollution. Careless or uninformed household management also contributes to NPS pollution.

To address this diffuse type of pollution, Congress established the Nonpoint Source Program, funded by the US-EPA through Section 319 of the Clean Water Act. The Tennessee Department of Agriculture administers the Nonpoint Source Program in Tennessee on behalf of US-EPA. This program, created in 1987, provides funds to states, territories and Indian tribes for installing Best Management Practices (BMPs) to stop NPS pollution; providing training, education, and demonstrations; and monitoring water quality.

The TDA-NPS Program is non-regulatory, promoting voluntary, incentive-based solutions. It is a cost-share program, paying for 60% of the cost of a project. It is up to the grantee to come up with the remaining 40%, usually in cash and “in-kind” services. It primarily funds three types of programs:

  • BMP Implementation Projects improve an impaired waterbody, or prevent a non-impaired water from becoming placed on the 303(d) List. Projects of this type receive highest priority for funding. All projects involving BMPs must be based on an approved “Watershed Based Plan”. Small projects can be funded to write these plans.
  • Monitoring Projects. Up to 20% of the available grant funds assist water quality monitoring efforts in Tennessee streams, both in the state's 5-year watershed monitoring program, and also in performing before-and-after BMP installation, so that water quality improvements can be verified.
  • Educational Projects funded through TDA-NPS raise public awareness of practical steps that can be taken to eliminate NPS pollution.

Eligible applicants include non-profit organizations, local governments, state agencies, soil conservation districts, and universities.

Contact: Responsible Staff @ xxx-xxx-xxxx x3

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The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination against its customers, employees, and applicants for employment on the bases of race, color, national origin, age, disability, sex, gender identity, religion, reprisal, and where applicable, political beliefs, marital status, familial or parental status, sexual orientation, or all or part of an individual's income is derived from any public assistance program, or protected genetic information in employment or in any program or activity conducted or funded by the Department. (Not all prohibited bases will apply to all programs and/or employment activities.)

Giles County Soil Conservation District is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer.

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Fig1. - A view of the pulpit rock in Norway. Or Tennessee if you happen to be there.

Burn Permits

Safety emphasized as warm weather brings increased activity:

Wildfire SeasonNashville, Tenn.– Visible signs of spring emerge as warm temperatures and sunny skies push back the doldrums from cold winters. As Tennesseans begin to take advantage of this weather to do some yard work around the home or farm, the Tennessee Department of Agriculture Division of Forestry wants to remind folks that if they are considering conducting an open burn, a burn permit is required in advance of such activity.

“Burning vegetative material that has accumulated around the yard or using fire to clear an old field can be an efficient tool to get rid of such debris,” said State Forester Steven Scott. “However, it is very important that citizens practice safe outdoor burning

recommendations. Obtaining a burn permit in advance of debris burning is our way of making the public aware of those recommendations and helping them know when, where and how it is safe to burn.”

The free burn permits are required in all areas of the state by law from October 15 until May 15 unless otherwise covered by local ordinances, so residents should check with their local government for other restrictions. The permits can be obtained by calling toll free 1-877-350-BURN (2876) or by visiting www.BurnSafeTN.org. Permits are generally good for 24 hours and can be issued for weekend burns.

 

More than 415,000 permits were issued last year for activities that included unconfined, outdoor burning of brush and leaves, untreated wood waste and burning to clear land.

Once a burn permit is obtained, debris burners should practice common sense while conducting a burn. This includes:

  • Establish a control line around the fire, down to bare soil before conducting the burn.
  • Notify neighbors and local fire departments in advance as a courtesy.
  • Have tools on hand such as a leaf rake and garden hose or bucket of water to help control the fire.
  • Watch for changing weather conditions as winds can blow the fire in the wrong direction.

Always stay with your fire until it is completely out. It is not only the smart thing to do, but it is also illegal to leave an open fire unattended.

Escaped debris burns are the leading cause of wildfires in Tennessee. The Division’s burn permit system has dramatically helped reduce the numbers of escaped burns since the program began in 1995. Burning without a permit is a Class C misdemeanor punishable by up to 30 days in jail and/or a fine not to exceed $50. Wildfires caused by arson are a class C felony punishable by three to 15 years in prison and up to $10,000 fines. Anyone with information about suspected arson activity should call the state Fire Marshal’s Arson Hotline toll-free at 1-800-762-3017.

For more information on the Tennessee Department of Agriculture Division of Forestry, visit www.TN.gov/agriculture/forestry. For more information on safe debris burning, visit www.BurnSafeTN.org.